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Nonfiction: America Has Gone Off the Rails. Steven Brill Sees Ways to Get It Back on Track.

In “Tailspin,” Brill looks at many problems plaguing the country, and the people who are offering solutions.

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By the Book: Ottessa Moshfegh: By the Book

Ottessa Moshfegh, author most recently of the novel “My Year of Rest and Relaxation,” would invite Edith Wharton, Ralph Ellison and Charles Bukowski to dinner: “I’d … want to know what it’s like to be dead, and whether writing great books has earned them any merit in the afterlife.”

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Nonfiction: Cyberwarfare — the Latest Technology of Destruction

David E. Sanger’s “The Perfect Weapon” is an encyclopedic account of developments in the cyberworld.

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Fiction: Surviving AIDS, but at What Cost?

Rebecca Makkai’s novel “The Great Believers” ricochets between an era when AIDS was a death sentence and the present, when its shadow still looms.

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Critic’s Notebook: A Critic Sells Books Down by the Seashore

A bookstore in the village of Wigtown, Scotland, allows people to run the shop while renting an apartment upstairs. A book critic for The Times recently took his turn at the till.

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Books of The Times: Going for Broke, the Middle Class Goes Broke

“Squeezed: Why Our Families Can’t Afford America,” by Alissa Quart, is a timely book about the increasing number of people who feel profound economic vulnerability.

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Nonfiction: Writing as Drag: Alexander Chee’s Essays Consider the Novelist’s Craft

In “How to Write an Autobiographical Novel,” a new essay collection, the author of “The Queen of the Night” argues that writing fiction involves allowing yourself to become someone else.

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Books of The Times: What the Living Can Learn by Looking Death Straight in the Eye

In “Advice for Future Corpses (and Those Who Love Them),” Sallie Tisdale writes about what she’s learned from spending time with the dying.

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Nonfiction: Are More and More People Working Meaningless Jobs?

In “Bull__ Jobs,” the anthropologist David Graeber argues that technological advances have led to people working more, not fewer, hours at useless jobs.

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Feature: Jonathan Franzen Is Fine With All of It

The internet has turned on him, his book sales are down and the TV adaptation of his last novel has stalled. But he wants you to know one thing: He’s not even angry.

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By the Book: Samantha Hunt: By the Book

The author Samantha Hunt, whose novel “The Seas” will be reissued in July, has started an apocalypse library: “I enjoy all these books. I just hope I’ll never need them to survive.”

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Q. & A.: Tell Us 5 Things About Your Book: A Fresh Look at Benedict Arnold’s Treason

In “Turncoat,” the independent historian Stephen Brumwell argues that Arnold’s plot to foil the American Revolution was more complicated than it has previously appeared.

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Books of The Times: Stepping Out of Character and Starting a New Story

Deborah Levy’s new memoir, “The Cost of Living,” is about how she changed her life near 50 and learned that “the writing life is mostly about stamina.”

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Nonfiction: What Would Shakespeare Have Made of Donald Trump?

Stephen Greenblatt’s “Tyrant” finds parallels between our political world and that of the Elizabethans — and locates some very familiar characters.

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Fiction: Surviving AIDS, but at What Cost?

Rebecca Makkai’s novel “The Great Believers” ricochets between an era when AIDS was a death sentence and the present, when its shadow still looms.

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By the Book: Samantha Hunt: By the Book

The author Samantha Hunt, whose novel “The Seas” will be reissued in July, has started an apocalypse library: “I enjoy all these books. I just hope I’ll never need them to survive.”

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Nonfiction: Lots of People Love ‘To Kill a Mockingbird.’ Roxane Gay Isn’t One of Them.

Tom Santopietro’s “Why ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ Matters” is painstakingly researched, if substantively and structurally flawed, Roxane Gay writes.

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Nonfiction: Harper Lee and Her Father, the Real Atticus Finch

Joseph Crespino’s “biography” of the virtuous lawyer in “To Kill a Mockingbird,” and the real man he was modeled after, brings to life the inconsistencies of the South.

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The Enthusiast: In Praise of Julia Alvarez

“By the time I found ‘How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents,’ I’d already resigned myself to using books as windows rather than mirrors.”

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Books of The Times: Seeing the Art World Through Personal and Political Lenses

Nell Painter’s “Old in Art School” and Aruna D’Souza’s “Whitewalling” bring new energy and insight to questions that have long preoccupied the art world.

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Books of The Times: Sonnets That Reckon With Donald Trump’s America

In “American Sonnets for My Past and Future Assassin,” Terrance Hayes expresses ambivalence and grief for his country.

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Q. & A.: Tell Us 5 Things About Your Book: Drafting a Eulogy for Classic Rock

In “Twilight of the Gods,” Steven Hyden writes about what a generation of music gave to the culture — and whether any of it can last.

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Nonfiction: Harper Lee and Her Father, the Real Atticus Finch

Joseph Crespino’s “biography” of the virtuous lawyer in “To Kill a Mockingbird,” and the real man he was modeled after, brings to life the inconsistencies of the South.

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Nonfiction: An Exhaustive Analysis of Harper Lee’s Enduring Legacy in America

Tom Santopietro’s “Why ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ Matters” is painstakingly researched, if substantively and structurally flawed.

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Books of The Times: Pedaling Uphill, on a Bike and in a Marriage

In Joe Mungo Reed’s debut novel, “We Begin Our Ascent,” a cyclist competing in the Tour de France gets wrapped up in the complicated costs of possible victory.

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Nonfiction: Misty Copeland Pirouettes Through Two Books on Dance

Henry Alford’s “And Then We Danced” and Laura Jacobs’s “Celestial Bodies” explore the cultural and personal resonances of the art of movement.

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Q. & A.: Tell Us 5 Things About Your Book: Drafting a Eulogy for Classic Rock

In “Twilight of the Gods,” Steven Hyden writes about what a generation of music gave to the culture — and whether any of it can last.

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Essay: What a Father Learns by Reading With His Special-Needs Son

Reading to a child with cerebral palsy, the poet Craig Morgan Teicher discovers the many-layered pleasures of sharing an experience that is inherently private.

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Nonfiction: Is Our Obsession With Wellness Doing Us In?

In “Natural Causes,” Barbara Ehrenreich argues that our quest for perfect health is fundamentally misguided.

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Books of The Times: A Community Cracked Open by Fracking

Eliza Griswold’s “Amity and Prosperity” follows a single mother’s fight against the impact of fracking in her Pennsylvania county.

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