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By the Book: Rebecca Solnit: By the Book

The author, most recently, of the essay collection “Call Them by Their True Names: American Crises” keeps an eye on the “daily eruptions of the internet”: “Like a lot of us, I’m hypervigilant about the crazy stuff going on.”

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Nonfiction: A New View of Evolution That Can’t Be Represented by a Tree

David Quammen has written a sprawling history of evolutionary genetics, “The Tangled Tree,” that complicates familiar notions of how species evolved.

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Nonfiction: What Role Do Teachers Play in Education?

Andrea Gabor’s “After the Education Wars” looks at efforts to reform the classroom through technology and standardized testing.

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The Enthusiast: In Praise of Karel Capek

“This is the power of ‘War With the Newts’: It leaves us staring with bewilderment at the ways that we — with our tiny acts of greed and insensitivity and willful blindness — did all this.”

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Books of The Times: Expressing Complicated Love for Lauryn Hill as an Iconic Album Turns 20

In “She Begat This: 20 Years of ‘The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill,’” Joan Morgan makes a case for Hill’s artistic and historical importance while also paying attention to the stickier parts of the star’s career.

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Fiction: Two New Novels Expose the Fracturing of the American Nuclear Family, From Midcentury to Today

Cherise Wolas’s “The Family Tabor” and Rick Gekoski’s “A Long Island Story” both witness the unraveling of prominent Jewish families.

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Books of The Times: Fables Leap Back and Forth Through Time in ‘Flights’

Olga Tokarczuk’s novel, the winner of this year’s International Man Booker Prize, is full of bizarre and harrowing stories that blend fiction and fact.

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Nonfiction: On the Ground in Afghanistan and Iraq

C.J. Chivers’s “The Fighters” provides gut-wrenching descriptions of the battles in the Middle East.

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An Appraisal: V.S. Naipaul, a Writer of Many Contradictions and Obvious Greatness

Naipaul, who died at 85 on Saturday, was a self-styled heir to Joseph Conrad, and a legitimate one.

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Books of The Times: A Case for the New Jazz Sound That Will Inspire Playlists

In “Playing Changes,” Nate Chinen argues that we’re living in a brilliant new phase of jazz, and offers an annotated guide to his favorite performers.

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V.S. Naipaul, Who Explored Colonialism Through Unsparing Books, Dies at 85

Mr. Naipaul, who was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2001, wrote about the liberation movements that swept across Africa and the Caribbean, where he was born.

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By the Book: Anne de Courcy: By the Book

The biographer and journalist, whose latest book is “The Husband Hunters,” avoids thrillers: “I get all the mayhem I want in the newspapers.”

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Nonfiction: Leonard Bernstein Through a Daughter’s Eyes

In “Famous Father Girl,” Jamie Bernstein is a warm, wry observer, peeking from the wings as her father glories, sifting through the jumbo pill box when he falls apart.

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Nonfiction: Black, Gay and Becoming Visible

In Darnell L. Moore’s memoir, “No Ashes in the Fire,” he describes a brutal childhood in Camden, N.J., and the struggle to fully accept his identity.

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Fiction: A New Thriller Imagines a Revolt Against the Corporate Order

In Olen Steinhauer’s “The Middleman,” a revolutionary anticapitalist movement seeks to unite the disaffected of America’s red and blue states.

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Fiction: The Angst of the Creative Millennial, as Fodder for Satire

In “Hits & Misses,” Simon Rich dissects his generation’s culture with humor and empathy. A review by Nate Dern.

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Books News: How a Young War Veteran Became a Serial Bank Robber, Then a Novelist

Nico Walker’s Autobiographical novel “Cherry” traces his descent into addiction and crime. It’s being called the first great novel of the opioid crisis.

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Anya Krugovoy Silver, Poetic Voice on Mortality, Dies at 49

“My joy exists with pain,” Ms. Silver wrote. Her poems moved in a new direction after she received a diagnosis of breast cancer in 2004.

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All the World’s a Crime: Thrillers from Around the Globe

Our map of crime novels and detective fiction offers far-flung suggestions for your summer reading.

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The Book Review: Lydia Millet on ‘Fight No More’

“Everything’s so outrageous now in the public sphere,” Ms. Millet says. “You can’t really be more absurd or more fictional than real life is right now.”

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Inside the List: Around the World With Books: A Peek at Global Best-Seller Lists

In August, the best-seller lists here don’t change much. So we decided to look elsewhere — Germany, Canada, Italy, the Netherlands.

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A Conversation With: Maria Konnikova Shows Her Cards

The well regarded science writer took up poker while researching a book. Now she’s on the professional circuit.

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Our Back Pages: Notes From the Book Review Archives

In which we consult the Book Review’s past to shed light on the books of the present. This week: Fareed Zakaria’s first book, “From Wealth to Power.”

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Children’s Books: Actress Diane Guerrero Recounts Her Family’s Deportation Ordeal

In “My Family Divided,” the “Orange Is the New Black” star tells the story of coming home at age 14 to find her parents gone, taken by immigration authorities.

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Nonfiction: Going Solo: An Author Chooses — and Celebrates — Life Without a Partner or Kids

Glynnis MacNicol’s smart, pithy memoir, “No One Tells You This,” celebrates women who buck cultural norms.

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Anita Miller, Who Battled John Cheever’s Family, Dies at 91

An author and publisher with an eclectic bent, she was a founder of Academy Chicago, which sold feminist, mystery, literary and children’s books.

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Children’s Books: How Do We Tell a New Generation of Teenagers About the Vietnam War?

Elizabeth Partridge’s “Boots on the Ground” includes some disturbing images and facts. But today’s activist teenagers can handle a fuller account of American conduct during the war.

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Sketchbook: In Order to Write, It Must Be Right

A room of one’s own? The cartoonist Grant Snider thinks a writer needs a lot more than that.

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Nonfiction: Mughal Men Ruled South Asia — and One Man Was Ruled by a Woman

The daughter of Persian immigrants, Nur Jahan became the favorite wife and the co-ruler of Emperor Jahangir. Ruby Lal’s “Empress” tells her story.

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Nonfiction: Defending Conservatism, and Seeking Converts

Roger Scruton’s “Conservatism: An Invitation to the Great Tradition” is intended not only for the author’s political allies but for liberals too.

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