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Sketchbook: In Order to Write, It Must Be Right

A room of one’s own? The cartoonist Grant Snider thinks a writer needs a lot more than that.

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Nonfiction: Mughal Men Ruled South Asia — and One Man Was Ruled by a Woman

The daughter of Persian immigrants, Nur Jahan became the favorite wife and the co-ruler of Emperor Jahangir. Ruby Lal’s “Empress” tells her story.

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Nonfiction: Defending Conservatism, and Seeking Converts

Roger Scruton’s “Conservatism: An Invitation to the Great Tradition” is intended not only for the author’s political allies but for liberals too.

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The Shortlist: Fictional Glimpses of the Past: From the Tudors to the Czars

England and Russia figure in two recent novels, while in the New World, historical fiction revisits the 19th-century Caribbean and the American West.

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Nonfiction: Looking Back at the Economic Crash of 2008

Adam Tooze’s “Crashed” examines “how a decade of financial crises changed the world.”

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Essay: Au Revoir, Nancy! A Children’s Book Author Kisses Her Character Goodbye

As Jane O’Connor, the author of the Fancy Nancy books, ends her series, she reflects on the intimate connections she’s fostered with young readers.

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Fiction: A Novel That Delves Into the Mind of a Famous Schizophrenic

In “Playthings,” Alex Pheby tells the story of Daniel Paul Schreber, a German judge who described his own struggles with mental illness.

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Fiction: ‘A Terrible Country’ That’s Impossible Not to Love

The young Russian-American protagonist of Keith Gessen’s new novel returns to the country of his birth and discovers both misery and magic.

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Letters to the Editor

Readers respond to recent issues of the Sunday Book Review.

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Profile: Olga Tokarczuk’s Book ‘Flights’ Is Taking Off

It is not her only novel to be translated into English, but it is the first one to establish her reputation beyond her native Poland.

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These Are Some of the Best Book Reviews We’ve Ever Read. A Sing Sing Prisoner Wrote Them Over a Century Ago.

Back in 1911, The Times discovered a trove of literary criticism inside one of the state’s most notorious prisons — but couldn’t figure out who the author was. 107 years later, we’ve solved the mystery.

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Books of The Times: ‘Crashed’ Connects the Dots From 2008 Crisis to Trump, Brexit and More

Adam Tooze shows how the financial crisis radiated outward, shaping not only the new economic order but the ensuing political free-for-all.

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Books of The Times: David Quammen Turns Tough Science Into Page-Turning Pleasure

In “The Tangled Tree,” Quammen tells the story of a groundbreaking idea in biology, and of the scientists who discovered and explained it.

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Fiction: A New Thriller Imagines a Revolt Against the Corporate Order

In Olen Steinhauer’s “The Middleman,” a revolutionary anticapitalist movement seeks to unite the disaffected of America’s red and blue states.

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Newsbook: Read These 3 Books About Global Warming

Predictions and solutions in these books drawing on scientific research and social policy.

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Q. & A.: Tell Us 5 Things About Your Book: Imagining the Unimaginable in a Nuclear-War Novel

Jeffrey Lewis’s first novel, a speculative work of fiction, has a harrowingly plain title: “The 2020 Commission Report on the North Korean Nuclear Attacks Against the United States”

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Nonfiction: William T. Vollmann Would Like a Word or Two About Climate Change. Or 1,200 Pages.

In his two-volume “Carbon Ideologies,” the writer examines from many angles what we are doing to the earth.

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Nonfiction: How Citigroup Escaped Financial Disaster in 2008

James Freeman and Vern McKinley’s “Borrowed Time” takes a close look at the government bailout of Citigroup.

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Nonfiction: Science or Quackery? The Study of Hormones Has Been Both, a New Book Suggests

Randi Hutter Epstein’s “Aroused” looks at the history of hormone research and the many missteps along the way.

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Books of The Times: An Award-Winning Biographer’s Latest Subject: Herself

Claire Tomalin, the acclaimed biographer of Jane Austen, Charles Dickens and others, recounts her own rich story in “A Life of My Own.”

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Nonfiction: What Happened When Fracking Came to Town

Eliza Griswold’s new book, “Amity and Prosperity,” is an impassioned account of the devastating effects of fracking on a community in southwestern Pennsylvania.

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Nonfiction: The Worst Drug Crisis in American History

Beth Macy’s “Dopesick” describes the opioid epidemic that is killing thousands every year.

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By the Book: Sophie Hannah: By the Book

Sophie Hannah, whose Hercule Poirot novel “The Mystery of Three Quarters” will be published this month, is addicted to self-help: “Write a book and call it something like ‘The Five Secrets of Badass Kickassery’ and I will buy it immediately.”

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Books News: Meet the YouTube Stars Turning Viewers Into Readers

Reading and writing are solitary activities; BookTube is changing that.

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Nonfiction: Who Desegregated America’s Schools? Black Women

“A Girl Stands at the Door,” by the Rutgers historian Rachel Devlin, shows how the work of desegregation was done disproportionately by a young population that felt called to action.

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Nonfiction: Learning From Henry Kissinger

“Kissinger the Negotiator,” by James K. Sebenius, R. Nicholas Burns and Robert H. Mnookin, presents diplomacy as the art of influencing friends and adversaries.

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Books of The Times: Finding Alarm and Consolation About the Apocalypse in Two New Books

Things are worse than ever, Roy Scranton insists in “We’re Doomed. Now What?” They always have been, Eugene Thacker says in “Infinite Resignation.”

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Fiction: Anne Tyler’s Latest Heroine Quits Cushy Arizona for Quirky Baltimore

In her new novel, “Clock Dance,” a staid retiree plunges into the off-kilter lives of a single mother and her daughter.

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Books of The Times: A Syrian Refugee Lands in Ireland in ‘From a Low and Quiet Sea’

In Donal Ryan’s new novel, recently longlisted for the Booker Prize, a Syrian doctor settles in Ireland, where his life intersects with two other shattered men.

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