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Books of The Times: Can a List of Someone’s Stuff Double as Literature?

Thomas Clerc’s “Interior” is a tour of all the objects in the experimental writer’s 50-square-meter Paris apartment.

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Nonfiction: When the Creator of Sherlock Holmes Exonerated a Convicted Murderer

Margalit Fox’s “Conan Doyle for the Defense” tells the forgotten story of a man wrongly convicted of a crime and a writer’s help in pursuing justice.

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Fiction: Who Really Wrote This Thriller? Our Critic Has a Guess

A psychopathic but oddly charming coke dealer shoots and blusters his way through “The Price You Pay,” a brilliant, blood-soaked (maybe) debut novel

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Q. & A.: Tell Us 5 Things About Your Book: A Refugee Says, ‘Call Me American’

Abdi Nor Iftin went from a harrowing childhood in war-torn Somalia to freedom in Maine, thanks to winning a visa lottery.

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Books of The Times: A Parody of Smut — and of Voltaire — Turns 60

“Candy,” the satirical sex novel by Terry Southern and Mason Hoffenberg now available in a new anniversary edition, wages guerrilla war on prudery.

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The Book That Terrified Neil Gaiman. And Carmen Maria Machado. And Dan Simmons.

13 authors recommend the most frightening books they’ve ever read.

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Fiction: Competing Scientists Plus a High-Stakes University Lab Equals Murder

Megan Abbott’s dark, swampy new novel, “Give Me Your Hand,” is lit by a current of rage.

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Nonfiction: In the Middle Class, and Barely Getting By

Alissa Quart’s “Squeezed” examines the problem of families at the upper edge of the middle class, struggling to survive financially in America.

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Nonfiction: What if the Government Gave Everyone a Paycheck?

The former labor secretary Robert B. Reich reviews two new books arguing for a universal basic income: “Give People Money,” by Annie Lowrey, and “The War on Normal People,” by Andrew Yang.

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By the Book: Michiko Kakutani: By the Book

The Times’s former chief book critic Michiko Kakutani, author of “The Death of Truth,” doesn’t think in terms of genre: “J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter books are no more Y.A. reading, to me, than John le Carré’s Smiley novels are spy stories.”

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Books News: The Obama-Biden Bromance Continues. This Time in a Mystery Novel.

In a new crime novel, the 44th president and his vice president team up to solve a suspicious death, and patch up their frayed friendship in the process.

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Nonfiction: A White House Memoir That’s Equal Parts C-Span and ‘Sex and the City’

“The Corner of the Oval” is Beck Dorey-Stein’s fresh, funny, utterly unconventional account of working for President Obama.

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Books of The Times: How Conservatives Bet Big on Wisconsin and Won

In “The Fall of Wisconsin,” Dan Kaufman shows how the Tea Party’s philosophy has triumphed in a state long known for its progressive traditions.

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Books of The Times: Can Handiwork Save Your Soul? A Quiet Novel Suggests It Can

Daniel Gumbiner’s debut, “The Boatbuilder,” features an opioid addict who discovers the pleasures of physical labor.

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Q. & A.: Tell Us 5 Things About Your Book: The Many Costs and Confusions of Chronic Illness

In “Sick,” Porochista Khakpour writes about the ongoing physical, emotional and financial challenges she has faced with late-stage Lyme disease.

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Books of The Times: Struggling to Love, Work and Do the Right Thing in Putin’s Russia

In Keith Gessen’s new novel, “A Terrible Country,” a man in New York returns to his hometown of Moscow to care for his grandmother and gets entangled with political activists.

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Nonfiction: In the Middle Class, and Barely Getting By

Alissa Quart’s “Squeezed” examines the problem of families at the upper edge of the middle class, struggling to survive financially in America.

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[MORE]

Nonfiction: What if the Government Gave Everyone a Paycheck?

The former labor secretary Robert B. Reich reviews two new books arguing for a universal basic income: “Give People Money,” by Annie Lowrey, and “The War on Normal People,” by Andrew Yang.

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Nonfiction: America Has Gone Off the Rails. Steven Brill Sees Ways to Get It Back on Track.

In “Tailspin,” Brill looks at many problems plaguing the country, and the people who are offering solutions.

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Fiction: A Woman Sleeps a Year Away in Ottessa Moshfegh’s Darkly Comic New Novel

In “My Year of Rest and Relaxation,” a beautiful young Columbia graduate seeks spiritual renewal through slumber.

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Nonfiction: Does Vladimir Putin Speak for the Russian People?

Michael McFaul’s memoir of his years as ambassador to Russia, “From Cold War to Hot Peace,” recounts a campaign against the United States and the West.

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Books of The Times: When It Comes to Politics, Be Afraid. But Not Too Afraid.

In “The Monarchy of Fear,” the philosopher Martha C. Nussbaum writes against a tradition of philosophical and political thinking that minimizes emotions.

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Captain America No. 1, by Ta-Nehisi Coates, Annotated

This month, the writer takes the helm of the Marvel Comics series. He breaks down where he’s taking the Star-Spangled Avenger.

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Profile: Attention Please, Anne Tyler Has Something to Say

She’s not a recluse — or, as one critic called her, the Greta Garbo of the literary world — but she avoids interviews. So why is she doing one now?

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Nonfiction: Remembering Obama and Hoping to Win Again

Dan Pfeiffer, a senior adviser to President Obama, has written “Yes We (Still) Can,” a memoir of his years in the White House, with prescriptions for the future.

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Books of The Times: Toxic History, Poisoned Water: The Story of Flint

Anna Clark’s “The Poisoned City” and Mona Hanna-Attisha’s “What the Eyes Don’t See” view the water crisis in Flint, Mich., from different angles.

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Q. & A.: Tell Us 5 Things About Your Book: A Close Look at Where Kids Live, Learn and Play

In “The Design of Childhood,” the design and architecture critic Alexandra Lange examines schools, playgrounds, toys and other habitual features of young people’s lives.

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Books of The Times: A Sleeping Beauty Hopes Hibernation Is the Answer to All Life’s Problems

The narrator of Ottessa Moshfegh’s “My Year of Rest and Relaxation” hopes that a lot of self-induced sleep will help her “reappear in some new form.”

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By the Book: Ottessa Moshfegh: By the Book

Ottessa Moshfegh, author most recently of the novel “My Year of Rest and Relaxation,” would invite Edith Wharton, Ralph Ellison and Charles Bukowski to dinner: “I’d … want to know what it’s like to be dead, and whether writing great books has earned them any merit in the afterlife.”

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Footsteps: The Balancing Act of Arches

Decades ago, the pioneering writer Edward Abbey immortalized then-empty Arches National Park. Can it survive the modern influx of visitors?

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